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Jul 5, 2017 - Celebrating July 4 with St. Mark's

Jul 3, 2017 - Pastor West Celebrates 35th Anniversary of Ordination

Jul 3, 2017 - Pandamania VBS

Jun 13, 2017 - Summer picnic photos

Jun 10, 2017 - Blood drive - July 21

Jun 10, 2017 - Ice Cream Social

May 14, 2017 - Wedding Anniversary Milestone

May 10, 2017 - The 2017 Annual Report Booklet is Out

May 4, 2017 - PandaMania VBS coming June 18-22

May 4, 2017 - Outreach Program Brings Food Packers to St. Mark's

Apr 23, 2017 - Progressions Milestone: Jacob Schreckengast is entering the Navy

Apr 16, 2017 - Photos from Easter at St. Mark's

Apr 14, 2017 - St. Mark's Celebrates the Seder

Apr 12, 2017 - Palm Cross Making

Mar 26, 2017 - Bowling Excursion

Mar 26, 2017 - Pastor West Installed as Intentional Interim

Mar 19, 2017 - Youth Fundraising Dinner!

Feb 13, 2017 - Hobby Expo 2017

Feb 12, 2017 - Second Saturday Mints

Feb 5, 2017 - Souper Bowl Sunday

Feb 5, 2017 - All the Languages of the Good News Milestone


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1517 - 2017
Celebrating 500 Years of the Reformation

 

Martin LutherMartin Luther issued the “Disputation of Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences” that became known as his “95 Theses” in Wittenberg on Oct. 31, 1517.  Martin Luther and his allies used  pamphlets, ballads and woodcuts to promote their message of the reformation of the church.

Following the practice of naming a “heresy” after its leader, the name "Lutheran" originated as a derogatory term used by Johann Eck during the Leipzig Debate in July 1519. Rather than “Lutheran,” Martin Luther preferred to describe the reformation as “evangelical,” which is derived from the Greek word meaning “good news.”

Generally speaking Lutheran teaching can be summed up by “Three Solas”: (1) Grace Alone; (2) Faith Alone; (3) Scripture Alone. The split between the Lutherans and the Roman Catholics began with the Edict of Worms in 1521, which officially excommunicated Luther and all of his followers.

LutherLuther’s Small Catechism (“Der Kleine Katechismus”) was published in 1529 for the teaching of children at home by their parents. Luther’s Large Catechism consisted of works addressed particularly to clergymen to aid them in teaching their congregations.

The Book of Concord or “Concordia” (1580) contains documents that explain what Lutherans believe. It includes the three creeds of the ancient church and Reformation writings such as Luther’s Small and Large Catechisms, and the Formula of Concord. Lutherans believe in “Salvation by grace through faith” — that salvation comes by grace through faith alone, not by works and sacraments.

Philipp Melanchthon (Feb.16, 1497 — April 19, 1560), was one of the primary founders of Lutheranism. Born Philipp Schwartzerdt, he translated his name to its Greek form — Melanchthon. He made the distinction between law and gospel the central formula for Lutheran evangelical insight.

The first Lutheran worship service in North America is believed to have taken place in what is now known as Manitoba on Jan. 23, 1620. The sermon was delivered by Pastor Rasmus Jensen. Massive immigration from traditionally Lutheran countries to the United States between 1840 and 1875 resulted in 58 Lutheran synods being formed.

The first Lutheran pastor to be ordained in the United States was German-born Justus Falckner on Nov. 24, 1703. German Lutheran Pastor Henry Muhlenberg was sent to North America as a missionary upon the request of Pennsylvania colonists. He is considered the patriarch of American Lutheranism.

As late as the 19th century, Lutherans in the United States still looked to their European homelands to supply pastors and worship materials. Founded in 1826, the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg in Pennsylvania is the oldest operating seminary in the ELCA.

Read more about the Reformation: